York Town Square

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York’s Black history

Key resources about black history

Selected stories about black history in York County

Selected Black history posts, sites on social media

Database of known burials in North York’s Lebanon Cemetery.

Friends of Lebanon Cemetery, restorationists of this historic black cemetery.

Videos and photo galleries

“Assemblage” art exhibit promotes black togetherness and shatters stereotypes

“Casting Shadows” exhibit shows African-American York residents through history

Treasure of African-American art at Crispus Attucks Community Center (Video)

‘Hate is a consuming fire’: Sister of Lillie Belle Allen gives heartfelt speech. (Video)

Almost Forgotten: A glimpse at African American’s in York County’s past (Video)

Other resources

African-American collections, photos in York County History Center Archives

 

 

Samantha Dorm, from left, Wayne Scott and Tina Charles are among those restoring Lebanon Cemetery, the York-area’s historically black cemetery dating to 1872. Some information about the cemetery, according to these organizers: The first burial dates to 1873. The original cemetery was two acres with entry off of North George Street. Before 1904, more than 600 burials had taken place. More than 270 veterans – ranging from the Civil War through the Vietnam War – are interred here. 36 Civil War veterans are buried in Lebanon Cemetery. Several Spanish American War veterans’ graves are located on the grounds. The cemetery is the final resting place of the first York City resident to die in the Korean War – Roger Ballard.

This page is under construction. If there are other resources to consider for this list, please contact me: jimmcclure21@outlook.com.

 

Fawn AME Zion Church in Fawn Township. looking from the oldest part of its cemetery. The original log church was closer to the cemetery – the final resting place of Civil War soldiers and people born in the early 1800’s.