York Town Square

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Women’s history Archives

April is the 150th anniversary of world-shaking events. The Civil War ended, and President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. This Northern Central Railway shows the times the slain President Abraham Lincoln’s train was to pass through the rail towns in York County, Pa. The train, indeed, rolled by , stopping only in New Freedom, to pick up Gov. Andrew Curtin, and in York, where a team of women from the town placed flowers on the funeral bier. The president was shot on Good Friday, and he was honored in Easter services and a special mid-week service at Christ Lutheran Church. So when his funeral train was stopped in York, Easter themes were top of mind. ‘He was crucified for us,’ a black man was heard to say.

Old places from one’s youth that are no more often evoke History Mystery comments on the York, Pa., Daily Record’s Facebook Page. This one not only brought some likes and comments, but also hundreds of folks, whether stumped or just wanting to read about this place, followed the goo.gl link to the story. Remember this place? F

Reminders about our history is everywhere around York, Pa. Here’s one. This plate is affixed to the door in the former home of the Visiting Nurse Association in the 200 block of York’s East Market St. Those furnishings are long gone, VNA is operating elsewhere and the building is usefully deployed by Keystone Auctions. But this York Daily Record photo gives us an opportunity to bring forth word of this unsung hero of Jeannette Zinn. In this story about Jeannette Zinn, I wrote that a room was furnished in the Girls’ Club in York. It appears that the VNA played host to the Girls’ Club because here’s that room.

York countians like to comment on buildings, that’s proven by their engagement on Facebook. But we like to eat, and we like to share, like and comment about those delicacies that are distinctively Pennsylvania Dutch and York County, Pa.

Alpacas such as those seen here on Shady Pine Farms in North Hopewell Township are relatively new to York County, Pa., soil. But as the desire for natural fibers has grown in America, this South American animal is increasingly seen around York County, a county that is no stranger to working in the carding, weaving and spinning business. In fact, a museum is opening to educate and observe York County’s long relationship with textiles.