York Town Square

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Wheels of York Archives

April is the 150th anniversary of world-shaking events. The Civil War ended, and President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. This Northern Central Railway shows the times the slain President Abraham Lincoln’s train was to pass through the rail towns in York County, Pa. The train, indeed, rolled by , stopping only in New Freedom, to pick up Gov. Andrew Curtin, and in York, where a team of women from the town placed flowers on the funeral bier. The president was shot on Good Friday, and he was honored in Easter services and a special mid-week service at Christ Lutheran Church. So when his funeral train was stopped in York, Easter themes were top of mind. ‘He was crucified for us,’ a black man was heard to say.

Old places from one’s youth that are no more often evoke History Mystery comments on the York, Pa., Daily Record’s Facebook Page. This one not only brought some likes and comments, but also hundreds of folks, whether stumped or just wanting to read about this place, followed the goo.gl link to the story. Remember this place? F

We’ve been tracking grand old facades, and here’s another great York, Pa., front – the HiWay Theatre in the 700 block of West Market Street. Notice the unguarded, unchained bicycles in this undated photo. And notice the signs for air conditioning, a popular feature of such venues before home units went in. The old theater building, sans facade remains standing and in productive use.

This J. Horace Rudy oil painting, owned by Derek Dilks, is dated 1924. The works of the longtime York artist of a century ago are still known – and valued – around York, Pa.

Yes, the Lady Linden. And a grand lady she is. Queen of The Avenues, a neighborhood that grew along the trolley line that ran from York, Pa.’s Continental Square to Dover. As this Picturing History slider shows, at left is the Lady Linden, an 1887 Queen Anne house on Linden Avenue in York, circa 1890. And at right, the Lady Linden, now a bed and breakfast, is seen in a late 2014. The Lady Linden’s website gives this brief history: ‘Lady Linden was built in 1887 for industrialist Samuel Nevin Hench. He and his business partner, Walker A. Dromgold, came to York from Perry County in 1878 to manufacture farm harvesting implements for steam tractors and horse drawn. Many of these items were of their own design and patent and were shipped to international destinations. They built their houses side by side with the same design footprint here on Linden Avenue and raised their families here. Both these gentlemen were very active in the community and family members remained here until 1920.”