York Town Square

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Susquehanna, waterways Archives

At YorkTownSquare, we like to help you discover new places to explore, to increase your sense of discovery about York County and surrounding areas. This one comes from a surrounding area – Pylesville, Md., just south of the Mason-Dixon Line. It’s Eden Mill, part of the Eden Mill Nature Center.

Actress Monika Ross is seen in the character of York County’s Amanda Berry in the play ‘Susquehanna to Freedom: The Role of the Susquehanna River in the Underground Railroad.’ Dr. Dorothy King, a York native, will present about PennOwl Production’s play on Sept. 6. A news release says the drama tells the story of three slaves who traveled northward on the Susquehanna from Havre de Grace, Md. – where the Susquehanna River enters the Chesapeake Bay.

A fun part of the History Mystery quizzes on York, Pa., Daily Record’s Facebook page is engaging with the readers. In the post above and below, I went into the ‘threads,’ as the lines of comments are called, and supply more information. Meeting the reader is part of the fun of social media.

In York, Pa.’s, South Queen Street neighborhood sits a building with a rather elaborate marquee. York Sunday News columnist Gordon Freireich has noticed this for years. So he explored why this building, in South Queen Street’s 100 block, sported such a facade. You can find Gordon’s educated guess about why the building bears the marquee below. But for now, it’s fair to point out that he’s not certain

York County has so much history and just interesting natural and man-made history that it’s easy to forget that western Lancaster County’s stories tie into those on the west bank of the Susquehanna River. Lancaster County has Chickie’s Rock natural area and a town – Columbia – filled with the Turkey Hill Experience, the National Clock and Watch Museum and other attractions. Shenk’s Ferry glen is full of wildflowers. And now we learn from York Sunday News guest columnist Patricia Crider about the Wind Cave near Pequea, south of Columbia. The cave, she explains, resulted from shifting in the earth’s tectonic plates.

‘By land and by boat, visitors stopped at the center Saturday to see the improvements.’ So read a subhead on a York, Pa., Daily Record story about a day in which visitors could see improvements to the already vastly improved John and Kathryn Center for Heritage. Mark Platts, president of Susquehanna Gateway Heritage Area, said the revamped Lower Windsor Township site links water to land.

This restored mill looks great from the road. Same thing close up. The York, Pa., Daily Record received a tour of this wedding venue and came up with this lineup of photographs showing this impressive place. Stone Mill 1792 is one of several wedding venues opening around York County. But York County isn’t in danger of having too many such venues, a YDR story states.

York’s Vigilant fire company, captured here in this Picturing York before-and-after slider, has done heroic work for years. But there was a moment in the late 1800s when townspeople bailed out the fire company. Yorkblogger June Lloyd told about the response to a fire in a box car filled with apples and beans: ‘I guess it is kind of embarrassing if your horse-drawn fire engine runs away, is stopped by a collision with your other engine and has to be people-drawn to the fire. That’s what happened to York’s Vigilant Fire Co. in the late 1800s.’ June provided a newspaper account with her 2011 post that led with: ‘Here was a thriller!’