York Town Square

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Susquehanna, waterways Archives

This York County, Pa., building and its smokestack have brought up all kinds of stories, often spooky, over the years. It’s now used as a crematorium. So where does this building stand? Btw, what was its original use?

The York, Pa., Daily Record’s Jason Plotkin’s photos from above the Norman Wood Bridge are telling for several reasons. With a Susquehanna River bed like that, it’s obvious why the river over the centuries could not be navigated – or at least navigated by flatboats only in certain rainy seasons. It’s also why canals had to be put in on both sides of the river so that farmers and merchants could get their goods to market on the Chesapeake Bay.

Biesecker’s Mill is one of the most architecturally interesting mills standing in York County, Pa., today. An adaptive reuse plan to convert it into apartments is in limbo, though. ‘It’s a unique property, but evidently it’s so unique that no bank will touch it. So we’re kind of stuck here,’ owner Eric Bickleman told the York Daily Record. The rangy, pre-Civil War mill measures in at 17,000-square-feet. So with its future unclear (a GoFundMe site is set up), we’ll look at its past. The book ‘Millers’ Tales’ gives these facts about the mill. Products made there in its milling days: White Lily and White Swan flour, Yorko Dog Food, Golden Corn mill. Types of milling done there: grist, saw and distillery. The Biesecker in the name comes from one of its owners, John Biesecker