York Town Square

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This is the 1800s home of Dr. Adam Eisenhart, now part of the Stillmeadow Church of the Nazarene’s campus in Manchester Township, Pa. It’s among scores of properties on the Manchester Township Historical Society’s Historical Property Review. A digital file on the building lists the property of high historical value. ‘According to census data and genealogy research, the 1860 owner was Dr. Adam Eisenhart, 1811-1872. His wife was Leah Ferry (or Ferree), 1820-1882,’ the property review states. The historical society’s review consists of a mapped, searchable database of such historical structures.

The York, Pa., Daily Record’s Jason Plotkin’s photos from above the Norman Wood Bridge are telling for several reasons. With a Susquehanna River bed like that, it’s obvious why the river over the centuries could not be navigated – or at least navigated by flatboats only in certain rainy seasons. It’s also why canals had to be put in on both sides of the river so that farmers and merchants could get their goods to market on the Chesapeake Bay.

York County’s Delma Rivera-Lytle is seen with her aunt and uncle, Juan and Doris Román. Juan Román became the first U.S. victim of Lassa fever when he died visiting the Rivera in York County, Pa., in 1969. Lassa is a distant cousin of Ebola.

This is one of scores of memorable photos coming from Red Land Little League’s run for the Little League championship last month. The U.S. Little League champs brought Red Land to the attention of the world. And with that came the question: Where is Red Land? Two York Town Square posts exploring the whereabouts of Red Land earned spots 1 and 3 in pages viewed by readers in August 2015.

It’s called ‪the Hobbit House around York, Pa., and you can’t help but to look its way when you drive by it. Leslie Klinger got her wish to look inside. ‘I delivered pizza there on occasion. I was sooo excited the first time, they invited me in to have a look. Very kind and generous people,’ she wrote when this History Mystery photo appeared on the York Daily Record’s Facebook page. Another Facebook commenter, Heather Klinefelter, quipped: ‘Haha! I call it Toad Manor.’ Hobbits? Toads? We’ll side with the Hobbits. So, where does it stand? Have you ever had the opportunity to visit it?

A member of the community mentioned Christian Bucks, the youngster behind the widespread Buddy Bench movement, on a list of well-known people with York,County, Pa. links and roots. His idea is that if a student is sitting on the bench along, another student should recognize that and take a seat, too. The idea came up when Christian was a first-grader at Central York School District’s Roundtown Elementary School and it spread from there. Christian rightly appears on a list of accomplished people, as you’ll see below.