York Town Square

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Pain & trauma Archives

The fourth Journal of York County Heritage, the York County, Pa., Heritage Trust’s scholarly publication, came out in September with another slate of articles that push county scholarship ahead. All four pieces address the Civil War in York County.

This low-flying plane, captured by YDR Facebook reader Jen Coates, flew over York County Friday evening causing a record flurry of comments and other photos on that FB page. Someone at Delaware’s Dover Air Force Base thought it was a C-17 Air Force plane, after examining a photograph.

Recent Red Lion grad Sarah Amspacher sits at the memorial at North Hopewell-Winterstown Elementary School in Winterstown, Pa. As a kindergartener, she survived an attack by machete wielding William Michael Stankewicz.

This diorama of the Battle of Wrightsville, part of a museum in that York County, Pa., river town, shows Blue and Gray troop positions on Sunday, June 28, 1863. An audio presentation describing the diorama tells of the unknown black man killed in the Confederate assault on the Susquehanna River bridgehead. No monument stands to honor this Union defender. Interestingly, a grave marker for an unknown Rebel soldier was recently dedicated up river from Wrightsville. Interest is growing in a marker to recognize the Union defender.

This was York, Pa.’s, celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg and the Rebel occupation of York in the days preceding the battle. The Gazette and Daily page asked the question but never gave an answer. Fifty years later, the York City’s mayor and officials are silent on the anniversary for some reason, but others have stepped forward to highlight this major anniversary.

This explosion and house fire along Carlisle Road last week captured the attention of the York community. The Dover Township, Pa., structure went up with no loss of life. It was next to a vet’s office – remembered by many as the former home of Waltermyer’s flooring – but no one and no pets were injured there either. This is not the first time a house exploded around York County.

This newspaper clipping documents Richard Alwine’s entry into military service in the post-World War II period. Years later, the York County, Pa., resident remembers his time in Japan, in the years after the Hiroshima/Nagasaki atomic bombings. He brought in the before and after photographs of destruction on Hiroshima below.

This veterans memorial sits in front of Spring Grove, Pennsylvania, VFW 5265 at 199 W. 1st Avenue. Dozens of such veterans memorials are posted around York County. Check out this slideshow of photographs showing about 75 of these attractive markers.

Union military and civilian officials in Pennsylvania rightly viewed the Susquehanna River as a formidable barrier to the Confederate advance to the east. Still, they supplemented the mile-wide river with earthworks along its course. Here, an artist who witnessed the excavation shows workers digging trenches near Wrightsville in eastern York County to provide defenders leverage against an anticipated Confederate offensive to capture the bridge spanning the Susquehanna River between York and Lancaster counties.