York Town Square

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Pain & trauma Archives

This 1930 photograph from a Columbia-Wrightsville Bridge booklet shows part of the battlefield in Wrightsville 70 years after the Civil War. A Confederate brigade, under the command of John B. Gordon, approached the town from the west, bottom, and ran into an assortment of Union troops – regulars, invalids from the military hospital in York, militia and civilian volunteers. The Confederates sought to secure the bridge. Union command ordered the bridge burned to stop that advance. They succeeded.

Everett, Pa., is 70 miles from Gettysburg, and add on another 10 miles to Snake Springs Gap. So this bearing sign the familiar ‘Gettysburg Campaign’ title is long way from where the big battle took place in July 1863. This marker indicates how far the alarm of Robert E. Lee’s campaign of 1863 spread. And as usual when a big event occurs, York County touched this point in the mountains of western Pennsylvania, however gently.

A portion of the many honors accorded to York County’s Voni B. Grimes hang on the wall of his residence. Recent Ku Klux Klan activity in York County’s northern tip prompted Grimes to stop by the York, Pa., Daily Record’s office.

Confederate Gen. Jubal Early greets recent opening night attendees at an installation by Wayne White titled ‘FOE.’ The exhibit was part of what White described as a ‘three-ring circus’ that included the downtown installation, a lecture at sponsor York College of Pennsylvania and a retrospective exhibit on campus. ‘FOE’ will be open to the public through May 20.

Bob Rinehart, an eighth-grade social studies teacher at Southampton Middle School in Belair, Md. And he’s a 1983 graduate of West York High School and a 1994 graduate of York College of Pennsylvania. And he’s a descendant of a Civil War veteran from York County, Pa., and organizer of a major event – the American Civil War Day on Saturday, May 3.

The York Daily Record’s Kate Penn has produced ‘Back to Boston,’ a documentary about York County-area runners who are running in the Boston Marathon on April 21, Patriot’s Day in Massachusetts. Most ran in 2013, the year of the deadly Boston Marathon bombings

York, Pa., Daily Record/Sunday News columnist Mike Argento has written several times about the urban legend which places the Seven Gates of Hell on Toad Road in Hellam Township. The recent release of the film ‘Toad Road’ gave him another opportunity.

This scene is being replayed thousands of time around York County, Pa., and the region after this week’s storm downed countless tree and has left thousands still without power. Wouldn’t you know it. This storm, the most damaging of the series this winter, is the 13th.

Fire and ice? This photograph about sums up Icepocalypse, the storm that has left thousands of York countians without power even today, three days after this week’s storm. Jane Lindhorn submitted this photo to YDR.com’s Your Photos gallery. ‘A fallen branch contacted the power line and burned,’ she wrote.

York, Pa., Daily Record/Sunday News columnist Mike Argento used the term ‘Icepocalypse’ in a Tweet about this week’s ice storm: ‘Trees down everywhere. No cars on the roads. Power out everywhere. It’s the Icepocalypse.’ At one point, 70,000 York County residents were without power. Mike’s label kind of fit. So out of all the thousands of photos YDR professionals and residents captured of ‘Icepocalype,’ this Paul Kuehnel photo from Glen Rock tells the clearest image of the storm. If the storm can fell a tree of this size, ‘Icepocalypse’ works as a name for that storm.