York Town Square

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American Revolution Archives

York, Pa., Daily Record journalists, equipped with smart phones, deftly help cover the York County history front on their daily travels. The scenes above and below capture two moments from the scene of the events. The marker above describes the short-lived York Furnace Bridge that crossed the Susquehanna River in the 1850s.

After this YorkTownSquare.com post – Maryland nature center offers high dam, intact mill – I received this wonderfully composed photo of the Eden Mill Dam. It sits on Deer Creek in northern Maryland, but it has decided York County ties. The dam and nearby mill provided electricity for Fawn Grove in southeastern York County for years. Don McClure, the photographer, provided a couple of more photos of Eden Mill Nature Center on my Facebook page.

At YorkTownSquare, we like to help you discover new places to explore, to increase your sense of discovery about York County and surrounding areas. This one comes from a surrounding area – Pylesville, Md., just south of the Mason-Dixon Line. It’s Eden Mill, part of the Eden Mill Nature Center.

First they tilled the Springettsbury Township field, and then volunteers and trained archaeologists went to work. They found some 18th-century artifacts, significant because this could be the site of Camp Security, the British prisoner-of-war camp that operated from 1781 to 1783.

Actress Monika Ross is seen in the character of York County’s Amanda Berry in the play ‘Susquehanna to Freedom: The Role of the Susquehanna River in the Underground Railroad.’ Dr. Dorothy King, a York native, will present about PennOwl Production’s play on Sept. 6. A news release says the drama tells the story of three slaves who traveled northward on the Susquehanna from Havre de Grace, Md. – where the Susquehanna River enters the Chesapeake Bay.

The Colonial Courthouse has a new bell. The 1805 bell and its stand, formerly used at the old York County, Pa., Poorhouse, has some defects. So now a bell on the replica of the mid-1700s York County Court House is ringing again. But here’s the question.