YorksPast

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Transportation Archives

In 1872, the Northern Central Railway established a picnic area near Howard Tunnel. During summer seasons, scheduled and special steam trains transported organizations to and from these Tunnel Grounds; which were improved year-after-year into a first-class one-day destination for groups with a minimum of 20, however up to as many as 600.

Who remembers the Liberty Limited Dinner Train, which operated in southern York County from 1996 until 2001 on the old Northern Central Railway tracks; better yet, who traveled on the original Liberty Limited, the deluxe express train of the Pennsylvania Railroad, which included the same section of rails, in its run between Washington D.C. and Chicago from 1925 until 1957.

With York and Lancaster Counties recent establishment as the Susquehanna National Heritage Area, the time has come to extend the Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor through those counties. The decade long effort to gain the Susquehanna National Heritage Area designation emphasized the Susquehanna River as the focal corridor of culture and

In 1832 Phineas Davis built the “Atlantic” an improved version of his 1831 “York” locomotive for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. While the “York” was the first successful coal burning locomotive in the United States, the “Atlantic” was considered the first commercially successful locomotive; finishing its active life as a

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Navigation Works. Completed in November of 1833, the 11-miles of canal and slackwater, via the Codorus Creek, allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part twelve explores Dam 7 and Lock 9;

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Navigation Works. Completed in November of 1833, the 11-miles of canal and slackwater, via the Codorus Creek, allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part eleven explores the 3-Rise Staircase Locks 6,