YorksPast

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Susquehanna River Archives

With York and Lancaster Counties recent establishment as the Susquehanna National Heritage Area, the time has come to extend the Lincoln Highway Heritage Corridor through those counties. The decade long effort to gain the Susquehanna National Heritage Area designation emphasized the Susquehanna River as the focal corridor of culture and

Mahlon Haines’ Wizard Ranch might be a great location for a disc golf course. My first encounter with the Shoe Wizard occurred during a Haines scouting safari at that ranch in June of 1960. That first encounter was just in passing, as Mahlon walked through our area at Wizard Ranch.

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Navigation Works. Completed in November of 1833, the 11-miles of canal and slackwater, via the Codorus Creek, allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part twelve explores Dam 7 and Lock 9;

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Navigation Works. Completed in November of 1833, the 11-miles of canal and slackwater, via the Codorus Creek, allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part eleven explores the 3-Rise Staircase Locks 6,

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Navigation Works. Completed in November of 1833, the 11-miles of canal and slackwater, via the Codorus Creek, allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part nine explores Mundis Mill; located at the

My presentation Codorus Navigation Works premiered earlier this week at the monthly meeting of the Manchester Township Historical Society. I’ll draw upon that talk, plus further research, as I continue the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Navigation Works. Completed in November of 1833, this canal allowed

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Canal. Completed in November of 1833, this canal allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part seven explores Myers Mill; enlarged soon after nearby Dam No. 4 was raised in conjunction with

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Canal. Completed in November of 1833, this canal allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part six explores Small’s Codorus Mill; built concurrently with Dam No. 3 and Lock No. 3 of