YorksPast

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Springettsbury Township Archives

Drawings and a photo of a gathering at the Schaszberger-Dempwolf Farm were recently donated to the Springettsbury Township Historic Preservation Committee. Seated at the left part of that photo is Edward F. Schaszberger and at his shoulder is his grandson, 10-year-old, John Armour Dempwolf. Immediately behind Edward is his daughter

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Navigation Works. Completed in November of 1833, the 11-miles of canal and slackwater, via the Codorus Creek, allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part nine explores Mundis Mill; located at the

My presentation Codorus Navigation Works premiered earlier this week at the monthly meeting of the Manchester Township Historical Society. I’ll draw upon that talk, plus further research, as I continue the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Navigation Works. Completed in November of 1833, this canal allowed

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Canal. Completed in November of 1833, this canal allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part seven explores Myers Mill; enlarged soon after nearby Dam No. 4 was raised in conjunction with

UPDATED per comments by John F. M. Wolfe at my Karl Ort presentation in 2018. The original post INCORRECTLY stated the 560 Haines Road residence, on the northwest corner of Haines Road and 7th Avenue, contained the core of 1930-1937 York Airport office building. The CORRECT building, as pictured, is

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Canal. Completed in November of 1833, this canal allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part six explores Small’s Codorus Mill; built concurrently with Dam No. 3 and Lock No. 3 of

Friday afternoon, following a family history research visit, I was invited to provide impromptu instructions to a group of former Yorkers living in Laurel, Maryland; on tips in navigating and searching the YorksPast blog site. The group invited me out to dinner afterwards, where the topic of conversation evolved into

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Canal. Completed in November of 1833, this canal allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part four explores the nine-tenths of a mile long canal cut; located just north of York. Information