YorksPast

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Mill Archives

The rest of the story about Gotwalt’s Mill, at the S-curve in Camp Betty Washington Road, is told in this post. This mill is also referred to as Rider’s Mill and more commonly Bowser’s Cider Mill. The Olde Mill Cabinet Shoppe presently occupies this old mill structure in York Township.

I’ll share stories about the Barshinger Family of Barshinger’s Mill at a meeting of the Red Lion Area Historical Society on October 28, 2021. The presentation will take place at St. John’s UCC at 7:00 p.m.; enter into the rear of the church, off of the rear parking lot. Address

The origins of Springettsbury Township Park stretches back centuries. In 1793, Jacob Strickler established a 44-acre farm straddling present Mount Zion Road; with the farm fields worked by Strickler descendants, continuously for over 100-years. Dr. Louis V. Williams conveyed those same 44-acres to Springettsbury Township in 1966, at the conclusion of a 10-year installment payment plan. Three years later, the farm fields were transformed into the initial nucleus of Springettsbury Township Park.

A log house in Goldsboro was carefully dismantled about 25-years ago and stored in a barn. The owners of the dismantled log house for the past 13-years, Ted Pesano and his wife, were planning to reassemble the house as their residence, however circumstances have changed. The marked pieces and drawings, for reassembly, are now for sale. Their hope is that the log house can stay in York County.

Mike Spyker recognized a buckwheat field growing along Blackbridge Road between the York Mill of Ardent Mills and the York County Solid Waste Incinerator. Like sorghum planted in this field last year, buckwheat is an unusual crop in the Eastern United States. Nevertheless, buckwheat flour and buckwheat honey were staples of my grandparents.

Myrna Hyson Ross is responsible for funding the entire endeavor to restore the original stone 1857 Hyson One-Room Schoolhouse along Round Hill Church Road in East Hopewell Township. The Stewartstown Area Historical Society provided guidance in the six-year effort, which transformed a failing structure, surrounded by woods threatening to claim