YorksPast

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YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Navigation Works. Completed in November of 1833, the 11-miles of canal and slackwater, via the Codorus Creek, allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part eleven explores the 3-Rise Staircase Locks 6,

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Navigation Works. Completed in November of 1833, the 11-miles of canal and slackwater, via the Codorus Creek, allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part nine explores Mundis Mill; located at the

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Canal. Completed in November of 1833, this canal allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part seven explores Myers Mill; enlarged soon after nearby Dam No. 4 was raised in conjunction with

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Canal. Completed in November of 1833, this canal allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part six explores Small’s Codorus Mill; built concurrently with Dam No. 3 and Lock No. 3 of

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Canal. Completed in November of 1833, this canal allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part five explores how the Codorus Creek was navigated via thirteen strategically placed locks between the Borough

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Canal. Completed in November of 1833, this canal allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part four explores the nine-tenths of a mile long canal cut; located just north of York. Information

YorksPast continues the series of posts exploring the history of the Codorus Canal. Completed in November of 1833, this canal allowed navigating 70-foot long canal boats between downtown York and the Susquehanna River. Part three explores pertinent history of Loucks Mill. Information within agreements, and lawsuits, between mill owner George

Nearly a century ago milk chocolate was produced in York at a location now replaced by centerfield of PeoplesBank Park; the home of the Atlantic League’s 2017 championship baseball team, the York Revolution. Large cans of milk, bags of cocca beans and sacks of sugar were carted a short distance