YorksPast

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Lancaster County Archives

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century.  This is Part 3 of Chapter 8 . . . Rebels.  A new part will be posted every Thursday.  This chapter stands alone, starting

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century.  This is Part 2 of Chapter 8 . . . Rebels.  A new part will be posted every Thursday.  This chapter stands alone, starting

This is the first in a series of letters or messages sent to President Abraham Lincoln during the Invasion of Pennsylvania by the Rebels during June and July of 1863.  Other Letters to LINCOLN in this series include: Letters to LINCOLN; “We need John C. Fremont” Letters to LINCOLN; “The

RAILCAR GOLD is a historically accurate multi-generational fictional tale of hidden treasure, primarily set in York County, Pennsylvania during the latter half of the Nineteenth Century.  This is Part 1 of Chapter 8 . . . Rebels.  A new part will be posted every Thursday.  This chapter stands alone, however

YorksPast started with a post on July 26, 2012.  Ten months, to the day, later this is my 200th post.  Thus you’ve seen a brand new YorksPast post, on the average, 20 times per month. I’d like to thank everyone for reading and providing feedback to YorksPast.  I’ve decided to

Keystone Markers are in the news.  The March/April 2013 issue of Pennsylvania Magazine has a feature article on Keystone Markers.  June Lloyd wrote a post on her Universal York blog about these Keystone shaped signs marking entrances to many Pennsylvania towns.  Jim McClure noted on his blog, York Town Square,

In my post Late 1800s Factory Inspection Reports Assist in Identification of an East Prospect Photo  I wrote about finding these reports in the State Library of Pennsylvania.  For this series on the Top 50 York County Factories at the end of 19th Century, I’m using data from the 10th

I have previously looked at early York County related maps in YorksPast; such as: 1801 Susquehanna River Map by Benjamin Henry Latrobe 1821 York & Adams Counties Map by D. Small & W. Wagner 1824 Lancaster County Map by Joshua Scott; that contained York County information Several posts that utilized

In previous posts I wrote about the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania act passed April 11th 1793, authorizing a Susquehanna River Bridge from Blue Rock, Lancaster County to Pleasant Garden, York County.  This was the earliest river bridge authorized to York County and although the bridge was never built, the act provides