YorksPast

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Family Histories Archives

In a series of posts, I’m looking at the history of various families, structures and businesses in the area where the humpback bridge once stood on the Lincoln Highway at Stony Brook.  Other parts in this series include: The Humpback Bridge at Stony Brook, Part 1: Ettline’s Antiques The Humpback

In a series of posts, I’m looking at the history of various families, structures and businesses in the area where the humpback bridge once stood on the Lincoln Highway at Stony Brook.  Other parts in this series include: The Humpback Bridge at Stony Brook, Part 1: Ettline’s Antiques The Humpback

In a series of posts, I’m looking at the history of various families, structures and businesses in the area where the humpback bridge once stood on the Lincoln Highway at Stony Brook.  Other parts in this series include: The Humpback Bridge at Stony Brook, Part 1: Ettline’s Antiques The Humpback

In a series of posts, I’m looking at the history of various families, structures and businesses in the area where the humpback bridge once stood on the Lincoln Highway at Stony Brook.  Other parts in this series include: The Humpback Bridge at Stony Brook, Part 1: Ettline’s Antiques The Humpback

This aerial photo of the humpback bridge on the Lincoln Highway at Stony Brook was likely taken during the fall of 1952; if not, 1953 at the latest.  In a series of posts, I’m going to look at the history of various families, structures and businesses in this immediate area.

I made a comment in my post on Monday that the new fire station in Springettsbury Township is nearly in the “ghost shadow” of the former Stony Brook Drive-In Theatre’s massive outdoor movie-screen.  I’ll discuss that topic, in greater detail, on Friday. Related posts include: Neat Photos of a Drive-In

This mammoth sycamore is in front of the historic house located at 2901 Whiteford Road in Springettsbury Township.  The tree trunk has a circumference of 18-feet; resulting in a diameter of 5-feet, 9-inches.  One really does not appreciate how massive this tree is until you are standing on the sidewalk

This series grew out of my post A Personal Connection to the Burning of The Columbia-Wrightsville Bridge 150-Years-Ago.  This week I’m delving into the slight discrepancies between the accounts about the bridge burning; especially focusing on the list of names in the force of civilian carpenters and bridge-builders employed by