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Wrightsville Archives

Early commercial canners started out preserving vegetables. As techniques improved, it was inevitable that the heating and sealing process would be used for other foods. The photo above, from the November 13, 1950 York Dispatch, shows three women, Mrs. Lillie Greenawalt, Mrs. Reed Monroe and Mrs. Grace Wallace, picking buckets

Tomatoes and Shakespeare and York County? I recently wrote my York Sunday News column on the canning houses of York County, going back to the 1920s through the 1950s when the canneries dotted the county. Local farmers could easily haul their fresh vegetables just down the road to be canned

Lewis Miller drawing of himself and friends admiring 1868 Wrightsville bridge. Bridges make our lives so much more convenient. We have recently been hearing about the high cost of maintaining bridges. They are, of course, much more expensive to build from scratch. Where would we be if we didn’t have

Wrightsville has always occupied an important location in the transportation network. The Monocacy Trail, orginally a Native American path, became one of the first roads for the European settlers to York County and beyond. That road crossed the Susquehanna River at Wrightsville, first by ferry and then over bridges covered

We didn’t know how bad smoking was for our health 90 years ago, when cigar factories were springing up everywhere. In York County, we knew cigars were very good for our economy. For well over 150 years, processing tobacco into cigars kept many York Countians gainfully employed. Lewis Miller illustrated