Universal York

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transportation Archives

As I mentioned previously, it wasn’t difficult to get your name in the newspaper in earlier days. Stringers from every little community submitted very local news, for which they were many times paid by the length of the column. Many of these towns and villages had their own small newspapers,

I recently posted the first part of an 1874 newspaper article describing an evening excursion taken from the Peach Bottom Railway station in York to Springwood Park in York Township. The second half of the account is below, describing the good time had by all: “Soon partners for a ‘grand

In a recent post, I shared some 20th century history and photos of Springwood Park in York Township. The park closed in 1954, after operating about 80 years. Springwood was developed as a destination for picnicking and dancing by the Peach Bottom Railway. The narrow gauge railroad opened from York

You may have read my recent York Sunday News column on the fifteen ferries that connected York County with Lancaster and Dauphin counties across the Susquehanna River. There were so many that I didn’t have room in my column to share details on each ferry, gleaned from the York County

I’ve been getting good responses on my recent York Sunday News column on the fifteen or more separate ferries that crossed the river between York County and Lancaster County or Dauphin County. Perhaps that should be too surprising, since the earliest of these ferries date back to the 1730s and

When researching regional history, you often come across the name of Adams Express. From the mid-nineteenth century until World War I, that is how private citizens and businesses shipped items large and small. Think of them as Parcel Post, Priority Mail, UPS and FedEx all rolled into one. See my

Latrobe thought the Turkey Hill rapids or falls “most formidible.” Benjamin Henry Latrobe has been called one of the fathers of American architecture, but his work surveying and mapping the Susquehanna River in 1801from Columbia, Pa. to Havre de Grace, Md. was of more importance to the people of York