Universal York

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Susquehanna River Archives

Probable photo of the York Furnace bridge Residents of “the lower end” of York and Lancaster counties thought they could beat winter weather in the 1850s by building a bridge across the Susquehanna River at York Furnace. The Lancaster Examiner of November 20, 1855 celebrated the opening of the bridge.

Bridges make our lives so much more convenient. We have recently been hearing about the high cost of maintaining bridges. They are, of course, much more expensive to build from scratch. Where would we be if we didn’t have the four bridges (Norman Wood in the south, two at Wrightsville

Wrightsville has always occupied an important location in the transportation network. The Monocacy Trail, orginally a Native American path, became one of the first roads for the European settlers to York County and beyond. That road crossed the Susquehanna River at Wrightsville, first by ferry and then over bridges covered

My recent York Sunday News column outlined York’s enthusiastic proposal to become the permanent capital of the United States. Motions, debates, and votes for one location or another flew in 1789 during the first Congress under the United States Constitution. (The new Congress, which convened March 4, 1789, replaced the

McCall’s Ferry (Holtwood) Power Plant Under Construction, ca.1907. Electric power was on the front page 100 years ago. The Merchants Electric Light, Heat, and Power Company distributed hydroelectricity generated by the York Haven Water and Power Company, which utilized giant Kaplan turbines. These turbines were manufactured in York by the