Universal York

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Revolutionary War Archives

A few months ago I shared the information that a researcher at the British National Army Museum recently found color drawings, assumed to have been done by Sgt. Roger Lamb of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, illustrating Camp Security and the escape of Lamb and his friends. These are the only

I was in the East York post office the other day for the first time in a while. I was very pleased to see the black walnut Thanksgiving statues proudly standing in the lobby on their marble bases. It is so heartening every time you see some of our local

You may have seen the recent article and also the editorial in the York Daily Record concerning the final push by the Friends of Camp Security to raise the funds to repay the Conservation Fund for the 2012 purchase of 47 acres at the heart of site. (Click here for

What makes historical research so interesting, as well as frustrating, is that what you find usually leads to a lot more questions. Some time ago, at the Library Company of Philadelphia, I came across the ad above from the Pennsylvania Packet newspaper, published in Philadelphia. I made a copy of

I have had several comments and questions already about my recent York Sunday News column on the 15 or more ferries that crossed the Susquehanna River at one time or another between York County and Lancaster County. Since there were so many, I could only fit in a couple of

Was the building above connected to Camp Security? Twentieth century York entrepreneur, John William Richley said it might have been. In his 1951 autobiography, Obstacles No Barrier, Richley wrote: “Bought Farm near Longstown. In order to get my mind off my trouble [his wife had recently died] and get away

York’s venerable Lafayette Club, founded in 1898, recently closed its doors, the doors of an impressive four-story townhouse, the residence of town leader P.A. Small during the Civil War. To me, one of the most striking interior features was the large portrait of General Lafayette over the mantle. I recently

A few months ago I wrote about what was probably Declaration of Independence signer James Smith’s original gravestone. A newspaper clipping from 1887 said it had been found in a basement in South George Street. The present location is unknown. It was a mystery to the writer of that article,

This post is the fifth on my series exploring the five blue and gold historical markers placed on the square in York commemorating some of the events that happened there. The marker for the Articles of Confederation, on the northeast quadrant of Continental/Center Square, is the newest of the five.