Universal York

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Lower Windsor Twp. Archives

According to Prowell’s History of York County, Pennsylvania, the population of Lower Windsor Township in 1900 was 2,649. There were 15 schools to educate the township children. They were Will’s, Bittersville, Wrightsville, Benson’s, Canadochly, Craley, Martinsville, Furnace, Brenneman’s, Fitzkee’s, Yorkana, Kline’s, Neiman’s, Pikes Peak, and Long Level. (Note that these

I have used the illustration above when writing about the last two known Native American villages in York County. It is from Herman Moll’s 1720 map entitled: A new map of the north parts of America claimed by France under ye names of Louisiana, Mississipi [i.e. Mississippi], Canada, and New

Long-time York County Heritage Trust volunteer photo cataloger Paul Wolfgang asked me the other day if I know where “Devil’s Hole” was. He was cataloging a collection of photos connected with Raymond Jacob Sechrist and one was identified as being at Devil’s Hole. I didn’t know the location, but I

I learned some new things last week at Paul Nevin’s talk at the Zimmerman Center for Heritage, home of the Susquehanna Gateway Heritage Region. His talk focused on the last Susquehannock Indian village, the site of which is now part of the Native Lands York County Park, on top of

I have had several comments and questions already about my recent York Sunday News column on the 15 or more ferries that crossed the Susquehanna River at one time or another between York County and Lancaster County. Since there were so many, I could only fit in a couple of

My recent York Sunday News column (see below for full column) described the five Pennsylvania State Historical Markers in York’s Continental Square and the stories behind them. Over 2,000 or these blue and gold markers have been placed throughout the state since the program’s inception in 1946. Previously, historical sites

Why aren’t some of the gravestones in the cemetery between Canadochly Lutheran Church and Canadochly Reformed Church in Lower Windsor Township lined up in straight rows like those in the rest of the cemetery? The answer seems to be connected with the date that the church shown in the photo

Latrobe thought the Turkey Hill rapids or falls “most formidible.” Benjamin Henry Latrobe has been called one of the fathers of American architecture, but his work surveying and mapping the Susquehanna River in 1801from Columbia, Pa. to Havre de Grace, Md. was of more importance to the people of York

Barn at Rock Ford, site of Henry Kauffman Museum A friend, who is active in the Lower Windsor Township Historical Society, called my attention to the reopening of the Henry Kauffman collection at Rock Ford Plantation in Lancaster. She pointed out that Kauffman, who collected Pennsylvania German artifacts and wrote

Early commercial canners started out preserving vegetables. As techniques improved, it was inevitable that the heating and sealing process would be used for other foods. The photo above, from the November 13, 1950 York Dispatch, shows three women, Mrs. Lillie Greenawalt, Mrs. Reed Monroe and Mrs. Grace Wallace, picking buckets