Universal York

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hospitals Archives

We probably have all known local people who bravely served in the military during World War II. During that time the home front was also very busy. I have written columns and blog posts about the York Plan, the system of cooperatively switching our factories from peacetime to wartime production

Sources say that about 350,000 women served in the United States armed forces during World War II. WACS (Women’s Army Corps), WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service in the Navy, women in the Coast Guard (SPARS) and Women Marines served as nurses, administrators, instructors, office workers and in many

Those of us who were born in the first half of the 20th century remember what a big deal polio, measles, diphtheria, whooping cough and other communicable diseases were, before effective preventative vaccines were developed and immunizations were routinely available. Even those of us who were very small recall how

Dr. Florence Gipe was a very interesting woman. She was a pioneer in modern nursing education and also deeply interested in York County History and Civil War history. I only met Dr. Gipe once, even though she was a childhood friend of both my parents and my stepfather. They all

Just out–the brand new 2012 edition of Journal of York County Heritage, a popular periodical published annually by York County Heritage Trust. The new edition offers five well-researched articles on a variety of events from the 19th and 20th centuries. They include: “The Cartridge Box: The Inside-Out Newspaper of the

If they were able, convalescent soldiers at the Civil War hospital on York’s Penn Common didn’t just sit around. They were kept busy, aiding in their rehabilitation and saving the government money. They acted as nurses and clerks; they tended the gardens and grounds. Convalescents staffed the hospital post office