Universal York

Part of the USA Today Network

historic preservation Archives

Here are more photos from my tour several years ago of wonderful Federal Building at the corner of Philadelphia and Beaver streets. It was designed by nationally-known architect Willoughby Edbrooke, at that time Supervising Architect for the U.S. Treasury Department, to house the York Post Office and Internal Revenue Service.

Recent news reports indicate that the striking 1895 Federal Building, built to house the York Post Office and the local Internal Revenue office, is going to be redeveloped. About five years ago I recapped a detailed history of that building in my York Sunday News column. The column is still

We are not the only generation to denounce the destruction of landmarks once they are gone. Half a dozen recently demolished homes are listed in the April 17, 1866 York Gazette. I have transcribed and annotated the article to give an idea of what is now on those sites. OLD

This is the second in a series of posts reviewing the history and significance of Camp Security. As far as we know the site, just east of York, is the only remaining Revolutionary of War prisoner-of-war camp that hasn’t been pretty well completely developed over. The Friends of Camp Security

The Friends of Camp Security organization, of which I am a board member, is holding a public meeting Tuesday March 22 at 6:30 p.m. at the Springettsbury Township building, 1501 Mount Zion Road, York. Information on the upcoming 2016 archaeology dig at the site of the Revolutionary War prisoner-of-war camp

I think of the 1960s as a sad period for York County landmarks. In the city alone the City Market House, an architectural gem by the Dempwolf firm, was torn down, and the imposing Variety Iron Works fountain was removed from Penn Park. Churches, stores and businesses throughout the county

The hunt goes on for the various components that made up Camp Security, the Revolutionary War camp established to detain British prisoners in York County. Specific areas of interest, such as the palisaded stockade and the village for the captives accompanied by families, will eventually be located by careful research

My previous post on the 50th anniversary of the Golden Plough Tavern and General Gates House restorations gave a few highlights of the “smallest urban renewal project in the country.” See below for more on the story from my recent York Sunday News column. It relates how the whole community,

The public is invited to join York County Heritage Trust in celebrating the 50th anniversary of the restoration of the Golden Plough Tavern and General Gates House. Many free activities for the whole family will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday May 17 at the Trust’s