Universal York

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highways Archives

 I could go on about the dozens of picturesque covered bridges that used to dot the York County countryside, but this will be my last post on them for now. I realize that they were rendered obsolete by mid-twentieth century transportation needs and were not really sustainable. It is a

My last post outlined the 1948 fate of a covered bridge over the Little Conewago Creek just east of Zion’s View on Canal Road. It linked Conewago and Manchester Townships. At the same time a Hellam Township bridge over Kreutz Creek was also demolished for a more modern span. York

As I mentioned in my recent York Sunday News column on Theodore Burr’s 1815 bridge at McCall’s Ferry, the lower part of York County did not have a lasting river bridge until the Norman Wood bridge was erected in 1968. The Harrisburg Evening News article below, dated December 8, 1933,

I see York city is restoring its Keystone markers, those familiar keystone with a rectangle signs that tell you the town you are entering, where its name came from and how many miles down the road to another town. Good for the city–every bit helps in first impressions. There is

Wrightsville has always occupied an important location in the transportation network. The Monocacy Trail, orginally a Native American path, became one of the first roads for the European settlers to York County and beyond. That road crossed the Susquehanna River at Wrightsville, first by ferry and then over bridges covered