Universal York

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 I could go on about the dozens of picturesque covered bridges that used to dot the York County countryside, but this will be my last post on them for now. I realize that they were rendered obsolete by mid-twentieth century transportation needs and were not really sustainable. It is a

My last post outlined the 1948 fate of a covered bridge over the Little Conewago Creek just east of Zion’s View on Canal Road. It linked Conewago and Manchester Townships. At the same time a Hellam Township bridge over Kreutz Creek was also demolished for a more modern span. York

In 1801 famed engineer and architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe was commissioned by Pennsylvania to survey the Lower Susquehanna, with an eye to navigation and canals. A few years later, in 1807, Latrobe also reported on the Susquehanna to the U.S. Congress: “Four miles below Burkhalter’s ferry, the river arrives at

Last week Jim McClure included a link to photos on his blog post of a few years ago of Susquehanna River ice pushing over the banks in January 1959. They were originally shared by Jim Buckner, and taken by his father. While looking for something else yesterday on the newspaper

No wonder York County can’t claim any covered bridges anymore. Hurricane Agnes destroyed the last one, at Bentzel’s Mill, in 1972. Previous storms and floods took their toll of many others over the years. Lila Fourhman-Shaull, Director of Library and Archives at York County Heritage Trust just shared an August

York Furnace Bridge piers, probably in the 1890s. Residents of “the lower end” of York and Lancaster counties thought they could beat winter weather in the 1850s by building a bridge across the Susquehanna River at York Furnace. The Lancaster Examiner of November 20, 1855 celebrated the opening of the